Thailand for Heroes: An Interview with The Libertines
Miracles do happen. In the second half of 2015, the third album The Libertines will be released. Kevin Perry looked behind a screen of rehearsals in Thailand that “pumped fresh…

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We were the last rock stars: a collection of Noel Gallagher's best sayings
The king of rock and the witty master Noel Gallagher over the past decades has provided all music publications with invaluable news material. We decided to recall the best of…

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Almost Best Brothers: Interview with Disclosure
Three years ago, Guy and Howard Lawrence, speaking as Disclosure, began trying to make a difference in the radio charts for the better. Last September, the band released their second…

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Why The Stone Roses is still the coolest band in UK history

We could start the article with the words that The Stone Roses saved British rock music. That they became the reason for the appearance of Oasis, because they determined the shape and sound of the best bands of the 90s. We could also reveal a few secrets surrounding the name of this mysterious group. Of course, we will do all this, but only, you know, not at the beginning of the article. Let’s start it better, here’s how.

March 1989 I work at the Our Price Records music store in West London and receive a box of vinyl records in the mail. The most ordinary event for a music store, except that this time in a box is a real treasure.

Encouraging warnings that the year will be hot came earlier: a few months earlier boxes with nuclear albums by Chicago DJs, East Coast rappers, techno-fighters from Detroit, as well as frightening, strange and unusually juicy, began to arrive at the store Manchester group Happy Mondays, piling all the new sounds together and boiling a thick punk brew from all this. But still, in this box is something completely special, for the sake of which we will still rip each other’s ears. In the box is a traditional rock record made in England, but one in which there is will, fiction and magic. In the box is “Made Of Stone”, the new single by The Stone Roses.

The record is perfect. Paint-stained cover; slippery, like bullets, rhythms; guitars hissing like a fuse before an explosion; and after the explosion – philosophical reasoning and anxiety. And we don’t give a damn about the people crowding in the line: we spin the single over and over again – until even those who stand in line at the counter start asking for a copy.

While we listened to them behind the counter, the store manager, a bearded man of thirty with something, growled at us from the back room. It was a time of change. Six months later, the bearded man will be fired, and the debut album The Stone Roses, named after the group, will become a bestseller in our store. This March will turn our musical consciousness.

If someone still had doubts at that moment that music was capable of destroying the old order and determining the beginning of a new decade with its new hopes and opportunities, the debut album The Stone Roses dispelled all these doubts. For a long time no one called their songs with such overt self-confidence: “I Am The Resurrection”, “I Wanna Be Adored”, “This Is The One “(” This is exactly what you need. “). Even the lemon on the cover was revolutionary: as the Roses explained, Paris rioters sucked the lemon in 1968 to soften the effect of tear gas. In short, The Stone Roses was an explosion that all of Britain heard.

“We wanted to put an end to bands like U2,” explains vocalist Ian Brown on the insert for the upcoming “Very Best Of The Stone Roses” collection. “They were grandiose, bombastic, but they had absolutely nothing to say. And they were so far away from the people that we thought: “We are better. We will finish them. “I really felt that it was impossible to stop us and that no one would defeat us.”

The Stone Roses was good news for young music fans. Over the past year, ecstasy burst into British life as a hurricane, a new youth culture flourished in clubs in lush colors, but there was not a single rock band that reflected all this. Indie music was too gray and not ambitious enough to express great ideas, and the mainstream rock was ruled by centennial dinosaurs, which sausages were exclusively within the scope of what their accountants liked.

The Stones Roses were completely different. They themselves changed very quickly, adapting to the times: from stupid noise producers, they turned into a symbol of their era. Roses played the sweeping tunes of 60s musicians like Jimi Hendrix and The Byrds, disturbed public order with the arrogance of Sex Pistols, and also went beyond all known styles. They were brothers in spirit, handsome men, composing bold, uplifting songs that you could even dance to (you could dance in many respects thanks to Reni, such a cool drummer, who even talked as if Pete Townsend from The Who himself tried to strangle him) . They had their own style, which soon became universal.
“It was an amazing feeling,” recalls John Squire, guitarist and artist for The Stone Roses. “It all came together: the people we hung out with, the clothes we wore, the records we bought, the drugs we took. All this came together in the songs we wrote then.”

Rising into orbit, the Roses dragged the entire breathless nation with them. Their album was not a huge commercial success (it never rose above 19th place), but it slowly and confidently rolled around the country, attracting more and more new listeners, holding on the charts for as long as 86 weeks.

Scam News: Interview with Tame Impala
Kevin Parker got sick. Enough peace-loving hippie music! The sound is louder! This is what he says about Tame Impala's new album "Currents", released in July 2015. In an interview…

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It has been eleven years since the death of the legendary British radio host and disc jockey John Peale, but so far no one has been able to compare with…

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